Wagyu Filet Mignons

4 - 12 Steaks
Starting At
$157
Incl S&H

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Product Information

PRODUCT INFO

The most tender beef on the steer comes from the tenderloins, two small cylindrical muscles in the middle of the steer’s back that do very little work. Tenderloin steaks (aka filet mignons) are rich, buttery-soft pillows of beefy goodness, and Kobe filet mignons are even more so.

Wagyu beef (commonly known as "kobe beef" aka kobe-style beef or Australian kobe beef) is from a breed of cattle descended from Japanese herds, specially raised to increase its percentage of fat marbling to consistently high levels. More marbling leads to more flavor, tenderness, and moisture as the fat melts during the cooking process. Thus, wagyu filet mignons are both more flavorful and more tender than those cut from conventional beef.

STORAGE

Keep Kobe filet mignons frozen until you are ready to cook them. As they are individually wrapped within the case, it’s easy to thaw only as many as you’re planning on cooking for a particular meal.

Thawing Tips

RECIPES & TIPS

Cook wagyu tenderloin steaks as you would conventional beef filet mignon. Many Kobe beef aficionados believe that the best way to prepare wagyu steaks is to quickly sear them on a grill or hot preheated cast-iron skillet until a crust develops on the outside, leaving the center soft and barely cooked.

Three Techniques for Cooking Steaks

How to Tell Steak Doneness By Feel

Steak Recipes

Filet mignons are one of the steaks most often paired with sauces. Try serving your Kobe tenderloin steaks with a pan sauce made by deglazing the pan you cooked the steaks in with red wine, then simmering some finely sliced shallots in the resulting broth until softened. Once the sauce has thickened to your liking, taste it for seasoning and serve with your steak.

Recommended Internal Cooking Temps:

Rare - 120°-125°

Medium Rare - 130°-135°

Medium - 140°-145°

Medium Well - 150°-155°

Well Done - 160° and above